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THE RAMBLING VINE

Contentious Character
 
16 March 2021 | Contentious Character

Canberra Wine Week 2021

From Canberra Wines:

Grapes have been grown and wine made in the Canberra District since the 1840s, although in common with a number of other smaller Australian wine regions, the industry went into decline for several decades from the turn of the 20th Century.

Interest in viticulture and winemaking in the Canberra District was rekindled in the 1970s and 1980s with a number of what are now highly regarded vineyards and wineries. Our district, which spreads across Canberra, Hall, Murrumbateman, Yass, Bungendore, Lake George, Wamboin, Gundaroo and Collector has grown considerably over the past 50 years it is now estimated that there are some 140 vineyards with approximately 450 hectares under vine, and upwards of 40 cellar doors.

Canberra District Wine Week 2021, is not only a special year of celebration due to a disastrous 2020, but we’re recognising and celebrating 50 years of the first plantings of vines and subsequent production of wine within the district, cementing our place as a premium cool climate wine region in Australia.

And we want you to celebrate with us.

Here is how you can celebrate Canberra Wine Week at Contentious Character:

Join us for an Indulgence Wine Tasting experience with a 2-course meal

Over the weekend of 20-21 March and 27-28 March, enjoy an intimate group Indulgence Wine Tasting experience, hosted by a Contentious Character, followed by a 2-course lunch or dinner. 

You'll be joined by no more than 3 other couples. Wines will be curated for the group and drawn from the Founders Museum Collection, our unique collection of old world style aged vintages as well as from the Contentious Character range of new world styles.

Our Indulgence Wine Tasting was recently launched with new matched food elements as well - an experience unique to our winery and kitchen! You can check out the tastings menu here

When it comes to lunch or dinner, we offer a wide range of tempting fresh local produce in a blend of traditional Italian flair with contemporary Australian. Our food is chosen to complement our Canberran cool-climate wines beautifully - and yes, you'll also get a glass of wine of your choice with your lunch or dinner. 

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Wine Tastings only

Are you all about the wine only? We're hosting Indulgence Wine Tastings on their own for Canberra Wine Week as well.

Experience the best of Contentious Character by traversing styles and vintages across 12 wines with newly matched food elements including jamon, salami, cheddarbelle cheese and housemade pate. You can check out the tastings menu here

Available Saturday 20 to Monday 22 March and Thursday 25 to Sunday 28 March.

MORE INFO & BOOKINGS

 

We are so proud to be part of the Canberra Wine District.

Hope to see you at our beautiful winery in the rolling hills of Wamboin.

Contentious Character
 
5 March 2021 | Contentious Character

Riesling Day: Everything You Need To Know About Riesling Wine

In celebration of Riesling Day on 13 March, we thought we’d give you the lowdown on riesling wine from descriptions of sweet and dry rieslings, how to serve riesling wine including what to eat and pair it with and the state of riesling wine in Australia. 

Contentious Character - wineries near Canberra & NSW

A quick history lesson on riesling wine

The first mention of riesling dates back to 1435 in Germany, though of course there’s contention around that. 
For centuries, Alsace in France and Australia have also produced premium rieslings.

What we do know for sure is that by the 1850s, riesling had become a very fashionable wine, thanks to its popularity with German nobility. 

Riesling in Australia

Riesling came to Australia in the 19th century with the first planting at Camden Park near Penrith in New South Wales. It then spread throughout Australia, especially to South Australia in the hands and hearts of German settlers. 
According to Wine Australia, riesling is one of the most underrated wines in Australia. However, as of late, it is definitely on the rise in popularity, as it was in the 1960s and 70s.

The two most popular riesling regions in Australia are the Clare and Eden Valleys in South Australia. Here, their riesling is bone-dry with distinctive lime, lemon and grapefruit flavours.

But of course, we find ourselves in the Canberra district! Australian cool-climate rieslings are dry and complex, typically associated with tight, crisp finishes. 

You read that right - rieslings are not always sweet; they can be dry. 

Sweet riesling vs dry riesling

The most common misconception about riesling is that it is always sweet - and that it always tastes like that sugary, white cask wine (which in our opinion, shouldn’t really be called wine at all).

Riesling-Contentious Character - wineries near Canberra & NSW

But riesling can also be dry and in fact, Australian cool-climate rieslings (i.e. the rieslings you’ll find out of the Canberra wine region) are known for their crispness. Dry rieslings can have notes of apple, pear, lemon, pineapple and even rockmelon. 

Our 2015 Riesling, for example, is a bright riesling, with abundant fresh citrus aroma, and crisp finish, thanks to an acidity that's friendly, but firm. 

BUY 2015 RIESLING

Sweet rieslings typically have flavours of fruit and a lasting, sweet honey finish.  

But rieslings can’t just be broken down into ‘dry’ and ’ sweet’. The riesling grape is very versatile; it is complex and has excellent ageing potential where the flavours can mellow and develop over time. In fact, it’s one of the few white wines that can be aged for decades. Knowing this, it shouldn’t surprise you that rieslings can be also be dessert wines or sparkling wines!

Serving and pairing riesling wine

Because riesling wine is so diverse (thanks to its high acidity), it comes down to selecting the right riesling to pair with your meal.

Dry rieslings are great with seafood, curries and other Asian dishes. 

Sweet and aged rieslings match deliciously with rich cheeses, salty cheeses and even fruity desserts.

Contentious Character - wineries near Canberra & NSW

So to celebrate Riesling Day, start with a crisp, dry riesling and a zesty ceviche. Our 2017 Riesling, ‘Come The Raw Prawn’, features lemon and lime with a floral twist combined with a crunch green apple texture and hints of tangerine make for an enjoyable finish. As the name suggests, our 2017 Riesling works wonderfully with prawns or any seafood for that matter. 

BUY 2017 RIESLING

Then, follow up with a richer, dry riesling with an Asian dish (think a curry or even Korean fried chicken). Our 2019 Riesling, ‘Crisp In Your Cakehole’, is a delicate riesling with citrus and cut hay aromas, underpinned by rich lemon flavours; we love to match it with an Indian fish curry!

BUY 2019 RIESLING

 

 

 

Finally, finish off with an aged riesling with a cheese and fruit platter. Our 2005 and 2006 Founder Museum Collection rieslings were showered with awards and are now drinking their best, with rich honey-lemon flavours. 

And if you’re looking for a rounder Australian riesling, here are our tasting notes for our 2020 Riesling, ‘No Riesling to Worry’. 

BUY 2020 RIESLING

As a general rule of thumb, serve your riesling at 8 degrees.

Contentious Character rieslings

If you’ve been paying attention, you might’ve noticed that our riesling range spans over a decade, from 2005 to 2020!
Come visit our cellar door and book a wine tasting to sample some of our Australian cool-climate rieslings and experience the best of the Canberra wine region.

Here’s to a delicious Riesling Day on 13 March!

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Contentious Character
 
16 January 2021 | Contentious Character

Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Wine Is Wrong

Unless you’re James Halliday or a proper wine snob, you’ve probably got the wrong ideas about wine. 

Because we like to be contentious here at Contentious Character, one of Canberra's wineries serving up the best Australian wine (no contention about that), we’re going to explore some of the things people often get wrong. 


PICTURED: One of our two pavilions; perfect for your small group celebrations. Book here.

“Wine is bad for you”

Says who? It turns out lots of people say this...but that doesn’t mean they’re right.

Hippocrates, famous for his early medical practices, recommended wine as part of a healthy diet. He said you could use it to disinfect wounds, ease diarrhoea and reduce the pain of childbirth. 

In 1991, a study found regular red wine drinkers had better cholesterol. According to the French Paradox, French people can eat more saturated fat, thanks to the resveratrol in red wine. In 2008, resveratrol was said to protect against dementia, fight obesity and Alzheimer's, lower lung cancer risk, and keep hearts “young”.

The British Heart Foundation and University of Cambridge upset the wine cart when they said drinking ten glasses of wine a week can shorten life expectancy by two years.

Meanwhile, a Spanish man then died in northwest Spain after a lifetime of drinking four bottles of homemade red wine every day...at 107 years old.  He never drank water.

The answer is clear: make up your own mind. 

“White goes with fish, red goes with steak”

This is one of those aphorisms that get wheeled out in restaurants all over Australia and perhaps the world. We may even learn it slightly before we’re even old enough to drink the stuff. But it’s wrong! It’s out of date.

You have to look at the cooking technique and the sauce before choosing a wine – not just whether it’s fish or meat. For instance, steak tartare or steak with béarnaise sauce goes very well with white Burgundy.

Another thing to consider is texture. If a fish is grilled, the smokiness passed on in the fish is often best paired with a red. 

It is also a matter of complementarity. A seared tuna steak with red wine goes with a Pinot Noir and a meat carpaccio with capers and citrus goes with Sauvignon Blanc. 

So just don’t say it again. It makes you look old.


PICTURED: Our vines looking lush!

“Organic wine is healthier”

The debate about organic versus non-organic rages in the food sector so why not the wine industry? You’ve seen those wholesome looking bottles of organic wine - you know the type where even the labels look healthy enough to eat. 

The arguments for organic wine are much the same as for organic food: fewer pesticides and heavy metals, more omega-3 fatty acids, more antioxidants, no antibiotics or synthetic hormones. 

But the real “problem” in conventional wine is sulphites. These are preservatives added to wine to prevent it from spoiling, oxidising or aging too quickly. Wine made with organic grapes can have sulphites up to 100 ppm, but conventional wine can have up to 350 ppm.

Unfortunately, it’s difficult to make wine that smells, looks or tastes like what people demand, without them. Very few people are actually allergic to them.

In this case, rather than be contentious, we take a balanced approach to the addition of sulphites.

“Only men like big reds”

It’s true; some men like big reds, because they enjoy admitting to liking things that are big.

But there are women who like them too. And the converse; that women only like soft, subtle reds like pinots or whites like chardonnay, is wrong too. Apparently, women have more sensitive taste buds so they tend not to like highly tannic or highly acidic wines. 

Men like to show off and boast with highly regarded and competition-winning wines. Now that is surprising (sense our sarcasm here please). 

At Contentious Character, we don’t succumb to these generalisations. We know all types of people like all kinds of wine. So that’s why we grow all kinds of wine for all kinds of characters. 

“Canberra wine is only for politicians”

Wow, you did not! How contentious. Our Australian wine at Contentious Character is too good to waste on just one small segment of the population, no matter how discerning they are. We are very inclusive and we welcome everyone, even if everything they think about wine is wrong!

Book a wine tasting, lunch or dinner today and come taste our wines and share our views (of the rolling hills of Wamboin - not political!) 

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